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About Sedona

Sedona Today

Art Galleries, hiking, fishing, bird-watching, plays, festivals, shopping, excellent dining and glorious RED ROCKS make Sedona worth visiting! Outdoor, fresh air activities delight both visitors and residents of this high desert. Sedona is located in Northern Arizona at 4500 ft. elevation, just south of Flagstaff. The high elevation, paired with the abundance of natural vegetation, create a pure, invigorating environment for nature lovers to explore and city folks to unwind.

Glorious red rocks of Sedona
Photos by: Andrew Holman Photography

Sedona is most commonly recognized for its majestic red rock formations and vortex sites. Spiritual healing, yoga workshops, and psychic readings are abundant in the natural surroundings. In addition, jeep tours, helicopter rides, horseback riding, aerial tours, and hot air balloon rides offer visitors a chance to see and learn about the area.

Noteworthy, among the natural delights of the area, is enchanting Oak Creek. As it flows throughout the winding Oak Creek Canyon and Sedona, Oak Creek offers a bit of tranquility to offset the breath taking power in the views of the many red rock formations. The Briar Patch Inn is nestled at the base of Oak Creek Canyon, just far enough from the bustle of town to truly unwind in the wonders of a natural environment.

Oak Creek Canyon in the Fall Sunset over the Red Rocks of Sedona

Sedona History

Bell Rock
Photos by: Andrew Holman Photography

Sedona's history started over 6000 years ago with the first settlers to the area. Native Americans lived in and around the Sedona area in a series of cave dwellings, some of which still exist today. In particular, the Hopi people, in a feat that is still marveled today, managed to grow corn, beans and squash in an area that averages only 15-20 inches of rain per year. Examples of the 4 or 5 story structures such as Montezuma's Castle or the Casa Grande ruins, built by various aboriginal cultures, provide excellent examples of early life in the area, although why the last tribe disappeared around 500 years ago still remains a mystery.

Between 1870 and 1900, the first non-aboriginal settlers to the area began to homestead around the Verde Valley area. Because of the remoteness of the region, initial growth was slow, but over time as more and more settlers arrived, the need for another postal station arose and T.C. Schnebly filled this void, naming the station after his wife, Sedona.

Sedona of the PastToday, Sedona has a population of approximately 21,500 residents with thousands of visitors each year enjoying the natural beauty and energy of the area. One of Sedona's more distinctive man-made attractions is the Tlaquepaque Arts & Crafts Village. Named for a picturesque suburb of Mexico's Queen City, Guadalajara, and meaning "the best of everything", the shopping center has become home to 45 unique shops filled with the works of local artisans and craftsmen. It is a unique blending of the old and the new, not unlike Sedona.

It is this blending of cultures, from the artistic works of Mother Nature 350 million years ago to the first human beings, magnificent cave dwellings, humble homesteads and artistic tributes like the Tlaquepaque Arts and Crafts Village that make Sedona a one-of-a-kind place. A visit to Sedona is an experience that will not be soon forgotten.

 

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